The Palace Theatre isn't just another Broadway house; it is a legendary landmark that's seen it all. Constructed in 1913, it was once the hottest ticket in vaudeville, playing host to everyone from Judy Garland to Houdini. It even has a "Judy Garland staircase" because the actress and singer would use it for surprise performances. Talk about a historic landmark!

1648 Seats

Wheelchair Accessible

Guide Dogs

Washrooms

Air Conditioning

Security Check

Accessible Toilets

Water Fountain

Hearing Assistance

About Palace Theatre

Seating chart
History
Architecture
Popular productions
  • Total seating capacity: The venue has a capacity of 1,648 seats.
  • Orchestra: The largest section offering some of the best and closest views of the stage, usually at premium rates.
  • Mezzanine: Elevated behind the Orchestra, this section gives you clear, sweeping views of the whole stage, especially from the front-row seats.
  • Balcony: The highest and smallest section, the views from here are more restricted but the seats are usually the cheapest.

Know before you go

Getting there
Facilities
Accessibility
Tips & guidelines
Nearby restaurants
  • Address: 160 W 47th St, New York, NY 10036, United States
  • Subway: The N, Q, R, and W lines stop at 49th Street, just a short walk from the theater. Times Square-42nd Street is within ten minutes from the theater.
  • Bus: The nearest stops are on 6th Avenue. Routes M5 and M7 stop at the corner of West 47th Street. The BxM2 also stops near the theater at 6th Avenue and West 46th Street. The Port Authority Bus Terminal is within ten minutes of the theater as well.
  • Parking: The Palace Theatre does not have a parking facility but you can park at nearby garages like Edison ParkFast on West 44th Street and the Icon Parking on West 43rd Street.

Frequently asked questions about Palace Theatre

What is the address of Palace Theatre?

Located at 160 W 47th St, New York, NY 10036, United States, this venue is easily accessible by all modes of public and private transportation.

Who owns the Palace Theatre in New York City?

Vaudeville theater owner and agent Martin Beck funded the construction of the Palace Theatre. When it opened in 1913, it was considered a flagship of impresarios Benjamin Franklin Keith and Edward Franklin Albee II's organization. It is now one of nine venues on Broadway operated by the Nederlander Organization and is co-owned by Jimmy Nederlander and Broadway producer Stewart Lane.

Is the Palace Theatre accessible to people using wheelchairs or patrons requiring hearing assistance?

The Orchestra section is entirely accessible, including designated wheelchair-accessible, companion, and transfer seats. The accessible restroom is also on this level, and all designated areas have step-free access. The rest of the theater is partially accessible. There are no escalators or lifts at this venue.

How much do Palace Theatre tickets cost?

Prices will vary across shows depending on the dates and seats selected.

What is the best place to sit at the Palace Theatre?

The Palace Theatre has a capacity of 1,648 seats split across The Orchestra section offers fantastic views and visibility across shows, while the elevated levels give you sweeping views of the whole stage, especially from the front rows. For intimate plays like dramas, being closer to the stage is better. But for larger ensemble productions, you get just as good views from the upper levels for cheaper rates.

What are some attractions or things to do near the Palace Theatre?

This theater is surrounded by sights to see, whether you're a traveler looking to do as much sightseeing as possible in a short time or a seasoned theatergoer looking to take in the city's vibe. Hit the classics like Madame Tussaud's and Times Square, especially if you're in the area for a late show, to be swept up by the sea of the city's bustling nightlife. For a quieter experience, try the gorgeous nature-based sights in the area, which include more frequented places like Central Park and the Hudson River or smaller ones like The Channel Gardens.